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rainsbury
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Username: rainsbury

Post Number: 61
Registered: 01-2013

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Posted on Tuesday, 12 January, 2016 - 12:10 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I have avoided the Arduino for years, I didn't need it and being a bit of a snob I have to admit that I looked down my nose a at it a bit.
However my daughter bought me a developers kit for Christmas and I am getting hooked, so seeing this years Teach in being based on Arduino made me smile. A lot.
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mikepokeeffe
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Username: mikepokeeffe

Post Number: 6
Registered: 07-2015

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Posted on Thursday, 14 January, 2016 - 09:41 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

The Arduino boards can be great and they have so much to offer the market. I've worked with them a few times myself (although my heart belongs to PIC). I've found the ease of use and getting up and going with them great. However I found difficulty in the more advanced control of the microcontrollers themselves.

I recently worked on one of their derivative boards from RedBearLabs, the Blend Micro, which has a Bluetooth module that works with the RedBearLab app. It was a great way to get up and running with Bluetooth. I'd love to see the same level of kits for other microcontrollers.

Can you post here what you do with your kit? It'd be interesting to hear what you do with it and how you find it as you delve further into it.
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istedman
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Username: istedman

Post Number: 393
Registered: 05-2005


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Posted on Thursday, 14 January, 2016 - 11:54 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Hi,

I've been playing with Arduino for a few years now. Nice and easy to get things going as there is a wealth of code and examples for most applications on the web. The standard module pinout and fritzing sketches, make connecting up new modules child's play.

My first project was a slight adaptation of a 'Moody useless machine' controller. That was fun. I created a low standby power, minimal Arduino, which is really an Atmega 328 + low quiescent current LDO or micropower boost regulator.

Second project was a datalogger. This used a Vinculum VDIP1 USB interface to sample 4 analogue inputs and temperature and using the real time clock module, datestamp the results. Debugging using the serial interface is a limitation of the Arduino. Would have loved an In-Circuit Debugger (ICD) for the device but I got the application debugged.

Have recently used an Arduino to test a DDS module, will eventually port the code to a PIC18F dev platform for my fancy function generator.

Programming in a C-style language makes it easy to learn. You can delve deeper into the hardware if you need to, there are normally examples around.
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cjay
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Username: cjay

Post Number: 268
Registered: 10-2013

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Posted on Friday, 15 January, 2016 - 01:00 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I've found the 'C like' code easy to follow and rewrite/port to PIC chips using MPLABX and XC8 etc.

I find the Arduino IDE very slow and limiting (it's related to COM ports and USB enumeration), lack of almost any debug support is a dreadful hindrance for the Arduino but it does have advantages with the wealth of examples out there (see first para) so you can test a new chip or module really quickly to 'prove' a design works before writing the real application for something else.

The Arduino developers and community get *really* snippy if you mention you may be using them for anything commercial and I see a battle beginning between the 'official' Arduino people and the 'clone' producers (quite how you stand when you have open sourced a project I have no idea but I digress) One possible direction I can see is that it could become a paid for IDE.

I'll stick with my PIC chips for now but always have a couple of cheap 'duino clones to hand for quick lashups and tests. (I've got a stunningly unpleasant arduino powered acrylic squirrel which plays MP3s and performs a light show that was a joke christmas gift for instance)

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