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'Master IC Cookbook' and 'Adventures ...

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dledgard
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Username: dledgard

Post Number: 4
Registered: 02-2017

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Posted on Sunday, 05 February, 2017 - 04:15 am:   Edit Post Delete Post Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

'Master IC Cookbook' and 'Adventures with Electronics' by Tom Duncan. When I was a young Electronics Enthusiast I looked up Digital Electronics (in the 1980's) IC's in the 'Master IC Cookbook'. It have all CMOS and TTL Digital Electronics Chips. CMOS is 3-15v and TTL 5V only. CMOS can't be damaged by static electricity, I think? Use an old Computer Powers Supply for 5V (Red Wire) or 12V (Yellow Wire), Ground - 0V (Black Wire). Or a 9V Battery with Battery Clip. They are very good books to learn from.
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perro
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Post Number: 194
Registered: 10-2007

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Posted on Sunday, 05 February, 2017 - 11:52 am:   Edit Post Delete Post Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I always understood CMOS devices tended to be MORE susceptible to static discharge than their equivalent TTL versions (unless ESD protection has been specifically designed in).

I believe the key advantage, when CMOS was introduced, was the significantly lower power consumption vs standard TTL.

Anyone care to clarify?
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bruce
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Post Number: 1134
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Posted on Sunday, 05 February, 2017 - 06:19 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Yup, that's nonsense: CMOS was the one that was prone to ESD and the front end is stuffed with protection devices.
CMOS had other things going for it: very low power, huge i/p impedance. IIRC it was easier to fabricate than TTL. And because the voltages of ON and OFF were further apart than TTL, it was less prone to noise. The drawback was the speed: much too slow, in the early days, for computing which demanded more and more speed.
bruce
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perro
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Post Number: 195
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Posted on Sunday, 05 February, 2017 - 06:32 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Thanks, Bruce
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tandy
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Posted on Monday, 06 February, 2017 - 11:10 am:   Edit Post Delete Post Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

4000 series CMOS are able to work at much higher voltages than TTL and indeed modern 74 (CMOS) series logic. Anything that MOS based is susceptible to static. The Metal Oxide layer is very thin so static can easily destroy the metal oxide layer.

You can use an old PC power supply for a general purpose power supply but generally speaking it isn't the best thing to use. The first problem is they are built down to a price meaning there is a lot of ripple and noise from them. It doesn't matter to a PC as the motherboard has onboard regulation. The second problem is they have fairly high current output without any protection meaning you can easily melt things. Any half decent bench power supply will have current limiting that will help reduce the likelihood of things going up in smoke.
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dledgard
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Posted on Monday, 06 February, 2017 - 12:52 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

CMOS 4000 and TTL 7400 Series chips had many used. x6 NOT Gates, x4 NAND, NOR, OR, Exclusive NOT, Exclusive NOR, 4-bit Counters, Clock Chip for processor CMOS 4047 or 555 Timer etc... Look them up on the internet. 500,000 people have tried making RED-ORANGE-GREEN LED traffic light kits on plugboard. Require Clock, Counter, Logic Gates. Like AND.
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bruce
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Post Number: 1135
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Posted on Monday, 06 February, 2017 - 02:23 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

When designers started to make logic chips all they had were transistors. TI came up with the 'totem-pole' output stage which offered an unassailable advantage in speed over other designs and Texas TTL cornered the market.
A decision was made ( which then became the standard ) of a 5V rail. The lower the better for heat dissipation, but you need to cleanly separate Logic '0' from Logic '1' and production spread means that the gap between 0 and 1 is only about 2 volts. Make it less and you get better heat dissipation, but you run into problems with noise.
Now, the 4000 series CMOS could indeed operate up to 20V before it fried, but the industry still operated them at 5V to make them 'mate' with TTL
and LS TTL. Only hobbyists used them at higher voltages; the last thing professionals want is higher voltages because of heat dissipation.

Now an interesting point: although 74HC series are sold as 4.5 to 6V, I have a suspicion ( I've never tried it ) that this is only to make the logic levels compatible with TTL. My bet is you could operate them up to 18V ( provided you don't mix and match logic series ).

Logic chips soon ditched bipolar and used CMOS, but they needed to improve the speed. Obviously they did, but I don't know how. The chips became faster and faster AND used less power. A miracle of engineering, but for a long time they stuck with the 5V rail, possibly to make different series chips backwards compatible.
It's all changed now: they have chips at 1.8V. Soon we'll be running our laptops from a 1.5V alkaline cell.
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petelobus
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Post Number: 303
Registered: 06-2005

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Posted on Monday, 06 February, 2017 - 04:01 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I have a small issue with Bruces comment 'only hobbists used them at higher voltage'. In the early 80's I was designing analogue control and instrumentation stuff, professionally, and for the few bits of digital logic I needed I used 4000 seris CMOS as it could live from the +15v rail I used for the op-amps. Admittedly I didn't need it to go too fast. The low current consumption was great too. There used to be the odd snag due to floating (unintentionally) inputs (unlike TTL they had to be firmly nailed up or down) and the fact that if the power pins of the chip were left disconnected they would sort of self power from the inputs, again with some strange results!

All a long time ago now!

Ian
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zeitghost
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Post Number: 2066
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Posted on Tuesday, 07 February, 2017 - 09:45 am:   Edit Post Delete Post Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

74HC14 datasheet:

https://www.nxp.com/documents/data_sheet/74HC_HCT14.pdf

Note the "Absolute Max" on the Vdd to Ground voltage.

It's not guaranteed to work correctly with +7V on Vdd to gnd, rather it's guaranteed to survive it.

So stick +18V on Vdd at your peril.

By the by, the HC series has CMOS thresholds, if you want TTL compatibility then use the HCT series.

Assuming, of course, that any of it is still available.
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james
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Post Number: 757
Registered: 02-2007

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Posted on Tuesday, 07 February, 2017 - 03:47 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Interesting to note that many of the 4000B series chips were produced in a pin compatible 74HC/74HCT technology version under the same ID code.

For example...

4017B (74HC4017) 5 Stage Johnson Decade Counter.
4060B (74HC4060) 14-Stage Ripple Counter with Oscillator.
4050B (74HC4050) Hex Buffer (can be used for level shifting).

Cheers

James
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741
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Posted on Thursday, 23 February, 2017 - 09:13 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

'Adventures with Electronics'...

I recall the "Wailing Siren"
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arw
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Username: arw

Post Number: 1823
Registered: 04-2005


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Posted on Friday, 24 February, 2017 - 06:29 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Funny what one remembers, I recall writing in the 90's about a Zetex siren chip (the ZSD100) for Circuit Surgery, it nearly blew my eardrums out.

Still available on you-know-where-bay

http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/BLUEBIRD-ELECTRONICS-ZSD100DEMO-EVAL-BOARD-SIREN-DRIVER-/271177910116

Alan
Alan W - EPE
Email alan@epemag.net

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